Unify Against Bullying Accepting Grant Applications!

 

uNIFY BULLYING SELFIE CHALLENGE PIC 1

Unify Against Bullying Executive Director, Christine Maiwald announced today that the organization is accepting grant applications online, effective September 1st. “Our number one goal is to inspire youth of all ages and to ignite their ideas as to how to prevent bullying. We encourage Parents, Guidance personnel, Teachers, Administrators and Charity Partners to also apply. Their programs must be dedicated to anti-bullying education and furthering the Unify mission; to bring an end to bullying through the celebration of true diversity.”
In addition to providing the seeds for children to come up with ideas on how to prevent bullying, Unify’ s high school students attend events and are given the opportunity to speak with younger students on the value of celebrating our differences. The students are also bringing education to their younger peers in school to explain what bullying is and the effects it has on an individual.

GROUP OF KIDS AND GRANTS UNIFY BULLY PIC 2
The organization has a committee of volunteers who will select the applicant’s initiatives that best reflect and advance their organizations mission. “This is the third year that Unify will be awarding grants that will educate and benefit youth from pre-school to high school and the community at large, says Maiwald.”
Unify Against Bullying has a website providing resources for students and families in need of assistance. Their “Selfie Challenge” is raising awareness globally to the silence that is associated with bullying. Unify creates and produces an annual all-inclusive fashion show that celebrates diversity. The show has been sold-out for the last three years and is live-streamed on Facebook to reach thousands of viewers. To learn more about this organization, please go to http://www.unifyagainstbullying.org
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SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY WELCOMES THE LARGEST FRESHMAN CLASS EVER!

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New Student Convocation at Sacred Heart University’s William H. Pitt Center – photo by Tracy Deer-Mirek

First-year students experienced all “the feels” as they embarked on their first days of their college experience at Sacred Heart University.

Their academic experience officially kicked off with SHU’s annual New Student Convocation in late August as the class of 2022 walked up the hill and into the William H. Pitt Center led by the marching band. The new students heard inspirational speeches from their peers, administrators and faculty encouraging them to do their best, take advantage of the many opportunities that will be presented to them and learn from their mistakes over the next four years.

Sacred Heart’s largest and most academically talented group of Pioneers in University history arrived with their families to move into their new residences just days earlier. They unloaded vehicles that were filled with everything they needed for a year away from home and gratefully accepted assistance from upperclassmen from SHU’s many extracurricular clubs and sports teams. The volunteers brought boxes of clothes, food, school supplies, toiletries and much more into rooms while the freshmen signed in and filled out required paperwork.

Tara Hagerman, 17, of Long Island, N.Y., briefly waited in the Toussaint lobby before being taken to her room by an orientation leader. Hagerman said she decided to come to SHU because she fell in love with the campus. “I had a relative who went here and had a positive experience, so I wanted to see what it was all about,” she said. “It’s beautiful. Everything is brand new and everyone is so nice.” Hagerman, a nursing major, said she’s looking forward to getting a good education. She’s excited to meet new friends, join the club volleyball team and get involved in other activities as well.

First-year student Adrianna Braid, 17, of Bergen County, N.J., was on the fifth floor of Toussaint Hall unpacking her belongings with her parents. She said she was most excited to meet new people and try new things. The exercise science major plans to join the exercise science club and intramural sports.

Newcomers’ statistics

There are 1,496 students in the class of 2022, chosen from an applicant pool of 10,619, the largest in SHU’s history. This is a 73 percent increase in full-time freshmen enrollment dating back to the fall of 2012.

“As the past several years have proved, an academic education and student experience at Sacred Heart University is in demand and sought after, and recent inclusion on The Princeton Review’s  list for ‘Happiest Students’ validates our belief that SHU provides an outstanding academic and social experience,” said Kevin O’Sullivan, executive director of admissions. “More than 10,000 students applied to the institution hoping for an opportunity to join the SHU community this year, and our admissions committee sought to identify students who demonstrated academic achievement, intellectual and professional integrity, who value compassionate service to others, and who took leading roles in the communities in which they serve. We couldn’t be more excited in presenting and welcoming our class of 2022 to our campus community. We also appreciate the many high school counselors, teachers, coaches, alumni and current students and families of SHU whose word of mouth and positive support help fuel this demand.”

 

The new freshman class distinguishes itself by its academic accomplishments, as evidenced by an average high school GPA of 3.5. More than 340 freshmen are National Honor Society members. The class also includes eight sets of twins and triplets and 125 legacy students, showing that previous family members valued their SHU experience and encouraged others to attend.

The freshmen hail from six countries and 26 states. A total of 2,919 undergraduate students will live on campus, the highest ever. As more residence halls go up on SHU’s upper quad, more and more students will have a residential experience.

 

Academics

The class of 2022 has diverse academic interests—popular majors include biology, communications studies, exercise science and nursing. A total of 480 new Pioneers plan to study in the College of Arts & Sciences, 292 students plan to study in the College of Health Professions, 250 will pursue careers in the College of Nursing, 419 will take courses in the Jack Welch College of Business and more than 50 students will study in the Isabelle Farrington College of Education.

 

Enrollment in the STEM fields within SHU’s College of Arts & Sciences increased by 16 percent over last year. This growth in enrollment is supported by the launch of new academic programs over the past few years in molecular and cellular biology, coastal and marine science, neuroscience, biochemistry, computer engineering and game design and development.

 

The Welch College of Business also experienced record enrollment success, with a nine percent increase in new student enrollment over last year, supported by the addition of a new academic program in hospitality, resort and tourism management. SHU’s acquisitions of Great River Golf Club in Milford and the former General Electric Headquarters in Fairfield, now known as West Campus—along with our property in Dingle, Ireland—will provide real-world experience to students in this program.

 

There was also significant growth in students pursuing interdisciplinary studies, which is the undergraduate academic path for aspiring elementary teachers who intend to continue on to the Farrington College of Education and earn their master’s degree in teaching as part of SHU’s innovative five-year program. Applications to the College of Nursing increased 12.7 percent over last year, supporting the national trend for a demand in undergraduate nursing programs. According to the inaugural rankings from NursingSchoolsAlmanac.com, SHU’s undergraduate nursing program ranks as third in the country among Catholic universities, behind only Villanova and Georgetown Universities. Admission to the program reflected that rank, with only a 40 percent acceptance rate.

 

Sources of success

Sacred Heart’s reputation is reinforced by the independent recognition it continues to receive. The Princeton Review recently recognized the University as one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education and included SHU in its Best 384 Colleges guidebook. It also placed SHU on its lists of “Happiest Students” and “Most Engaged in Community Service,” each of which comprises only 20 schools from around the country.

 

The University’s game design and development program has garnered national recognition as well, ranking among the best in the country by The Princeton Review at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Sacred Heart launched a new undergraduate academic program in cybersecurity this fall, to continue to support the growth of STEM offerings.

 

Facilities ready for students

Sacred Heart’s facilities are growing along with the student population. Construction crews have been working at the former Jewish Senior Services site for more than a year to turn the land—now called SHU’s Upper Quad—into a residential village. Last semester, SHU opened its newest residence hall on the Upper Quad, Toussaint Hall, where many first-year students settled.

 

The University continues to work on making West Campus an innovation hub. It provides an expansion for the School of Computer Science & Engineering, which is focused on computer engineering, computer gaming and cybersecurity, to develop programs in STEM fields such as health and life sciences, science and technology.

 

The 35,000-square-foot first floor of the west building at West Campus has been renovated into high-tech classrooms, computer labs and conference rooms. There is a cafeteria for grab-and-go food options and plenty of room for students to lounge and study. This year, the Farrington College of Education will have graduate classes for teaching preparation and education leadership in the classrooms. Undergraduate and graduate classes in computer science, information technology, gaming, cybersecurity and computer engineering also will take place there.

 

The makerspace—a large area on the first floor where engineering students can experiment, build and develop projects—is scheduled to be completed next fall. The students are using another room in the interim.

 

Construction on the building’s 35,000-square-foot second floor continues, preparing that space for classrooms for the Welch College of Business.

 

Construction also continues on the new Bobby Valentine Athletic Center, next to JP’s and Pioneer Park. The state-of-the-art fitness facility will serve the entire student population. At 57,000 square feet and three stories tall, it will be one of the most advanced athletic facilities in the nation, complete with a suspended indoor track, a bowling center, an 18-bike spin center, a 45-foot climbing wall and exercise and weight-training rooms. The anticipated opening is August 2019.

STCC student Lineisha Rosario has been named one of “29 Who Shine”

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STCC student Lineisha Rosario has been named one of the state Department of Higher Education’s “29 Who Shine,” a program that recognizes one outstanding graduating student from each public college and university in Massachusetts.

Rosario, of Agawam, and her faculty mentor, physics professor Beth McGinnis-Cavanaugh, represented STCC during a ceremony on May 4 at the State House in Boston. Rosario is a member of the Society of Women Engineers Chapter at STCC, and McGinnis-Cavanaugh serves as faculty advisor to the SWE STCC chapter.

Each year, the state honors outstanding students who show promise as future leaders and demonstrate a strong record of academic achievement. Students also are chosen based on their intent to pursue a career in a field where there is a demonstrated need in Massachusetts, among other criteria.

Rosario, who in May earned an associate degree in mechanical engineering technology, has excelled not only in the classroom, but also in her internship with a software company in Connecticut. She remains passionate about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“I have always been interested in how things made,” Rosario said. “When I was a child in Puerto Rico, I used to enjoy spending time with my father while he worked on cars. I wanted to know how things like cars were created.”

“We are thrilled to recognize Lineisha, and having sat with her, I know she represents all of the unique talents of our students – and in a critical STEM field,” said STCC President John B. Cook.

McGinnis-Cavanaugh and Gary Masciadrelli, professor and chair of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at STCC, submitted Rosario’s name for the award.

“Lineisha is very dedicated to the MET profession,” Masciadrelli said. “In the MET courses, she consistently submits excellent work. She has shown the ability to balance work and college, and I am confident she will have a successful career in manufacturing engineering.”

McGinnis-Cavanaugh added: “Lineisha is an advocate for women in engineering and community colleges and serves as a mentor to members of STCC SWE. She embodies the community college​ mission. Her story is compelling, and she has excelled in spite of challenges and obligations that might deter others. Her potential is limitless, and I look forward to the contributions she’ll make as an engineer.”

As a member of STCC SWE, Rosario attended the organization’s annual conferences in both Philadelphia and Austin, Texas.  With SWE, she worked with McGinnis-Cavanaugh to produce a series of video profiles about community college women in engineering.

Passionate about inspiring girls to major in engineering, Rosario will continue to volunteer her time with STCC SWE after graduation. She hopes to work full-time while she pursues a bachelor’s degree in advanced manufacturing systems on site at STCC through the college’s new partnership with Northeastern University.

“As I keep growing as a mechanical engineer, I realize there is so much more to learn as the doors in the world of engineering open for me,” Rosario said. “Not only do I want to keep growing professionally, I also want to keep encouraging other women to become engineers.”

Rosario and her family left Puerto Rico in 2015 and settled in Agawam, where she finished high school and then applied to STCC. She attended STCC’s STEM Starter Academy, a summer program for new students interested in science, technology, engineering and math.

Her curiosity about machines, and experience with the STEM Starter Academy, proved to be a good match with STCC’s Mechanical Engineering Technology Program.

When she receives her associate degree at STCC commencement on May 31, she will become the first member of her family to graduate from college.

Rosario plans to bring her parents and younger brother to the “29 Who Shine” ceremony, where Gov. Charlie Baker will honor her and the 28 other students.

“One of my biggest passions is to share my story with women who need encouragement to continue their pursuit of an engineering education and career,” Rosario said. “I also want to tell the elementary and middle school girls who, like me, are curious about how things are made and how they work, that in the 21st century women will be engineering the world.”

STCC to offer Career Exploration Summer Camp to area Middle and High School students.

STCC offers a variety of career exploration opportunities over the summer for middle and high school students as well as for students beginning their education at STCC in the fall.

“As the only technical community college in Massachusetts, STCC is a leader in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) education. We hope you’ll join us this summer to explore the many career opportunities available in the STEM field. STCC is committed to our community and we are pleased to invite you to spend part of your summer on our historic campus,” said STCC President John B. Cook.

The following opportunities are available this summer at STCC:

Career Explorations in Health Care

A partnership between the STCC School of Health and Patient Simulation and Baystate Academy Charter School, this program will allow 10th– and 11th-graders the opportunity to explore career options in Health Care through hands-on patient simulation experiences and visits from experts and guest lecturers. Students will also receive certification in the American Heart Association’s Basic Life Support CPR. Courses will run June 4th – June 20th, 9am – 3pm. This program is open to students enrolled in the 10th and 11th grade at Baystate Academy Charter School. For more information please contact the School of Health & Patient Simulation at shps@stcc.edu or 413-755-4510.

Engineering Technologies Math Boot Camp

A free, two-week program (Aug. 13 – 24) on the STCC campus for students who have been accepted into Engineering Technologies programs (Electrical Engineering Technology, Electronic Systems Engineering Technology, Optics and Photonics, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Computer Systems Engineering Technology, and related certificate programs). The Math Boot Camp prepares students to succeed as they enter their math class in the fall semester. Criteria for participation in the bootcamp are 1) Accuplacer placement into Algebra I or Algebra II; 2) acceptance into one of these associate degree or certificate programs. For more information please contact Marta Burgos at myburgos@stcc.edu or (413) 755-5424.

STEM Conference for Girls

STCC will hold a free, one-day STEM conference for girls on Wednesday, July 18.  Students will participate in workshops, do hands-on activities, and spend time with college students, faculty, and other community professionals to learn about opportunities within STEM.  Criteria for participation are 1) current middle school and high school girls (6th grade through 12th grade), and 2) past participation in STEM programming offered through HSI STEM, Urban League, and Latino Educational Institute. For more information please contact Marta Burgos at myburgos@stcc.edu or (413) 755-5424.

STEM Starter Academy

Six weeks (July 2 – Aug. 10). An all-expenses paid summer program for recent high school graduates, the STEM Starter Academy provides students with an introduction to STCC, two college-level courses, academic support and fun and interesting field trips so they are prepared and ready to hit the ground running when they start their fall semester. Completing students also receive a $400 stipend for their own use. Open to new students who have been accepted to STCC and have graduated from high school in the last two years with a focus on those interested in a STEM program. For more information please contact the STEM Starter Academy Director, Dr. Reena Randihr at rrandhir@stcc.edu or (413) 755-4576.

The Big Three STEM Pipeline Initiative through Urban League

This summer program begins July 3 and exposes and educates 20 high school students to various STEM job, career, or entrepreneurial paths in three fast-developing fields, health, game science, and cybersecurity. Program benefits include discussions with content experts; visits to local businesses and higher education institutions; student special project development opportunities; and familial engagement. The program will be held at STCC on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Completed applications can be dropped off or mailed to Dinah Moore at the Urban League, One Federal St., Bldg. 111-3, Springfield, MA  01105, or scanned and emailed to: dmoore@ulspringfield.org.  For more information: (413) 739-7211 ex. 102.

Topics in Biological Research  (BIO-117)

Topics in Biological Research (July 9 – Aug. 9, 8 a.m.noon) is an opportunity for students to be involved in hands-on open-ended research into the urban ecology of the STCC campus.  Students will learn concepts of urban ecology and will then develop their own questions, gather data and present their conclusions at a poster session.  An opportunity to present at a national undergraduate conference may also be possible. This is a college-level transferable lab-science course. BIO-117 is sponsored by the STEM Starter Academy with the goal of getting interested students involved in science.  To that end, STEM Starter Academy is subsidizing tuition and this course is free to qualified students. For more information please contact the STEM Starter Academy Director, Dr. Reena Randihr at rrandhir@stcc.edu or (413) 755-4576.

HOLYOKE COMMUNITY TO HOLD 71ST COMMENCEMENT

Holyoke Community College’s 71st Commencement will take place on Saturday, June 2, at 10 a.m., at the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield.

Associate degrees and certificates will be conferred to approximately 1,000 graduates.

Detailed information may be found at http://www.hcc.edu. More specific information about student and faculty speakers will be forthcoming closer to the Commencement date.

STCC TO OFFER SUMMER CLASSES

 

STCC pic 2017

(STCC) will offer five-week and 10-week on campus and online summer classes. Session One begins June 4, and Session Two starts July 9.

Summer classes are the perfect opportunity for area college students to earn college credit between June and August, said STCC Dean of Enrollment Management Matthew Gravel.

“Our summer offerings are chosen to appeal to a broad range of students, and most of the courses offered in summer can be used to fulfill requirements at other colleges and universities,” Gravel said. “But classes tend to fill up very quickly, so it’s important for students to register as early as possible.”

Academic subject areas include:  accounting, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, criminal justice, economics, electronic systems, English, graphic communication and photography, history, information technologies, math, medical terminology, music, philosophy, physics, psychology, sign language, sociology, Spanish and speech.

Class schedules are available at www.stcc.edu/summer. Students can register online, by phone at (413) 755-4321, or in the Registrar’s Office/Garvey Hall South/First Floor.

About Springfield Technical Community College

Founded in 1967 and located on 35 acres of the Springfield Armory National Historic Site, STCC is a major resource for the economic vitality of Western Massachusetts. As the only technical community college in Massachusetts, STCC, an Achieving the Dream Leader College, offers a variety of career programs unequalled in the state. STCC’s highly regarded transfer programs in business, engineering, liberal arts, science and technology continue to provide the most economical options for students pursuing a four-year degree. With an annual enrollment of more than 7,700 day, evening, weekend and online students, STCC is a vibrant campus rich in diversity.
SPRINGFIELD TECHNICAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

 

STCC TO OFFER SUMMER CLASSES

STCC pic 2017

(STCC) will offer five-week and 10-week on campus and online summer classes. Session One begins June 4, and Session Two starts July 9.

Summer classes are the perfect opportunity for area college students to earn college credit between June and August, said STCC Dean of Enrollment Management Matthew Gravel.

“Our summer offerings are chosen to appeal to a broad range of students, and most of the courses offered in summer can be used to fulfill requirements at other colleges and universities,” Gravel said. “But classes tend to fill up very quickly, so it’s important for students to register as early as possible.”

Academic subject areas include:  accounting, anthropology, biology, business, chemistry, criminal justice, economics, electronic systems, English, graphic communication and photography, history, information technologies, math, medical terminology, music, philosophy, physics, psychology, sign language, sociology, Spanish and speech.

Class schedules are available at www.stcc.edu/summer. Students can register online, by phone at (413) 755-4321, or in the Registrar’s Office/Garvey Hall South/First Floor.

About Springfield Technical Community College

Founded in 1967 and located on 35 acres of the Springfield Armory National Historic Site, STCC is a major resource for the economic vitality of Western Massachusetts. As the only technical community college in Massachusetts, STCC, an Achieving the Dream Leader College, offers a variety of career programs unequalled in the state. STCC’s highly regarded transfer programs in business, engineering, liberal arts, science and technology continue to provide the most economical options for students pursuing a four-year degree. With an annual enrollment of more than 7,700 day, evening, weekend and online students, STCC is a vibrant campus rich in diversity.
SPRINGFIELD TECHNICAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

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PROM DRESS DO’S AND DON’TS

pROM DRESS BLUE

 

Prom dresses are gorgeous and glamorous, but they can also be very uncomfortable. An uncomfortable prom dress can ruin your formal evening. That’s why you should consider not only the style and beauty of your eveningwear, but also the comfort level. Beauty doesn’t have to be painful. Fashion doesn’t have to ruin the most magical night of your high school life. Use the guide below to look elegant and feel great on your prom night.

PROM DRESS FOR COMFORT

When comparing prom dresses either online or at a formal eveningwear shop, consider the material of the dress, especially for the areas of your body where it needs to give a little. Prom dresses made of stretchy material in certain areas allow you to be comfortable and flexible while still keeping in fashion.

ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT THE PROM DRESS YOUR CONSIDERING

When you bend over to pick something up, sit or twist and turn while dancing, does the dress give in areas where needed?

When you sit to dine and need to move your arms freely, will the prom dress be comfortable?

Does the material breathe so you won’t get too hot during the prom or dinner?

If shopping for your prom clothing online, ask questions about the material and if it gives and breathes for ultimate comfort. Order your prom dress far enough in advance so you’ll have time to try it on and return it if you absolutely don’t like it.

PROM DRESS MATERIALS TO CONSIDER

Stretchy fabrics for prom dresses are great for those moveable areas of the body while dancing and dining. They’re also great for the tummy area for easier breathing. Look for prom dresses that are highlighted with stretch satin, stretch lace, stretch illusion, or stretch mesh. These materials will give and stretch as you move without taking away from the design of the dress. Other popular materials are ultrasuede, velvet, and silk or silk blends.

DRESS TIGHT PROM

PROM DRESS FABRICS TO AVOID!

Avoid fancy fabrics that are itchy, hot, or those that can tear easily. You’ll need a durable prom dress that can withstand all the movements while dancing. Also, avoid a lot of glitzy items that will make you uncomfortable or that can rub your skin such as sequence, lace, and beads. You might choose from prom dresses that are only modestly decorated with these items, but avoid excessive decoration for maximum comfort.

THE RIGHT PROM DRESS FIT

If you want a tight-fitting prom dress that clings to your body, you better make sure you can walk, sit, and dance in it before buying! There are many styles of long, elegant dresses that are made for beauty and walking, but nothing else. Many homecoming gowns, eveningwear gowns, and Quinceanera gowns are made this way, but prom night requires much more movement than many other special occasions. So, choose a prom dress that allows you to move, even if it is tight fitting.

Don’t settle for an uncomfortable prom dress. Shop around online at a prom dress specialty website for one that will allow you to make the most of your dream night!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Chris Robertson is an author of Majon International, one of the worlds MOST popular internet marketing companies. For tips/information, click here: prom dresses Visit Majon’s Clothing for Women directory.

“KID THINGS TO DO OVER SPRING VACATION”

cHILDREN RELY RACES

Get outside and Find Your Park during school vacation week at Springfield Armory National Historic Site April 18 – 22, 2018. It is one of 417 National Parks across America.

Enjoy a wide range of Junior Ranger activities aand earn a badge, patch and certificate. Museum admission and all activities are free of charge.

Wednesday, April 18 at 11:00am-12:30pm: Games Day!

From relay races to crossword puzzles join Ranger Dorothy for Armory related and Junior Ranger activities. All ages welcome. Bring family and friends!

Thursday, April 19 at 11:00am-12:30pm: Read with a Ranger

In celebration of National Pollination Week, join Ranger Susan as she reads a book on honeybees. After, make a bird feeder out of a pine cone, sunflower butter and birdseed to take home or plant a sunflower.

Friday, April 20 at 11:00am-12:30pm: Call to Arms!

During the Civil War, soldiers spent more time in camp, where they learned to march and drill, than they did on the battlefield. Join the Union Army for the day: sign up as a new recruit, learn about Civil War camp life, then march and drill with our Civil War Soldiers. Blank firing of a Civil War percussion rifle to follow.

Saturday, April 21 at 2:00pm: National Park Trivia

How well do you know your National Parks? Join Ranger Susan for her engaging and interactive National Park Trivia program. You won’t believe what Parks are in your own backyard!
Sunday, April 22 at 11am-12:30pm: Mail Call!
Everyone loves to receive mail! Join Ranger Scott and make a postcard using rubber stamp animal cutouts. Write about your visit to the Springfield Armory National Historic Site and send it to a friend or loved one.

For further information call (413) 734-8551, check the website at www.nps.gov/spar or go to www.facebook.com/sparnhs.

FOR ALL THE FASHIONISTAS! “MCQUEEN” FASHION DESIGNER BY Tom Rasmussen

Book Review McQueen April 2018

 

The savage beauty of his creative vision stunned and shocked the fashion world for over 15 years, with his avant-garde theatricality leading many to call him the enfant terrible of British fashion. He created fashion moments which have not faded from memory, like David Bowie’s Union Jack coat from 1996, Sarah Jessica Parker’s tartan Met Gala dress from 2006, and Lady Gaga in those alien armadillo shoes in the Bad Romance video clip in 2009.

But before he was Alexander McQueen, he was Lee Alexander McQueen, the boy from London who dreamed of becoming a fashion designer. He worked his way up from making suits on Savile Row to starting his own fashion label and becoming one of the youngest designers ever to win an award for British Womenswear Designer of the Year.

McQueen: An illustrated history of the fashion icon tells Lee Alexander McQueen’s story through the gorgeous illustrations of R.SONG and text by Tom Rasmussen, charting the rise and rise of McQueen through his life, his loves, his friendships, his struggles, his models and his biggest fashion moments, before his deeply sad death at the age of 40 in 2010.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
London-based Tom Rasmussen worked on runway shows in New York before becoming a fashion journalist. Their work has featured in publications including Dazed, Love, i-D and Vice.

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR
Sydney-based R.SONG is a fashion illustrator from Hong Kong who has collaborated with emerging fashion designers, street artists and writers.